A Dumbass Went Over Ingleborough…

Today’s hike was over Ingleborough in the Yorkshire Dales and I managed to pause my Apple Watch and forget to restart when we stopped for lunch, so god knows what these figures and the map means. You can safely double the elevation gain, likely the calories too as I missed recording the hardest, most technical part of the mountain to climb, and I think I would probably add around two miles or so.

It was a grand day out nonetheless.

Incidentally, Apple Watch in its current iteration is a quantum leap ahead of the turd I bought in the form of the first generation model. Superb battery life and excellent functionality. I got home after recording this hike and the battery had depleted to 68%. My previous watch used to last three hours recording workouts. This is a huge improvement.

Blog of Ages

Good lord, it has been such a while since last I posted. This post will appear slightly late relative to the activities as I forgot to renew my domain name so I have to do that first, but hey, I am still here and hopefully somebody somewhere is vaguely interested in what I have to say on here.

I have been jolted back into blogging by the weather improving and the nights getting longer. Here in Lancashire we have very dark winters where the day essentially ends around four o’clock. This is particularly annoying for those with a family. The last week has seen sunny days and temperatures around ten degrees celsius which is definitely all the excuse I need to break out the hiking boots.

I ran twice this week. Conveniently my GP is about 0.6 miles away so if I jog there and back it’s a decent fifteen minutes or so of raised heart rate, which is fine just for a daily thing whilst I wait out the winter months. I am currently running using the latest Apple Watch and the auto pause does not always work properly indoors so the figures for mileage times and pace during the first run are wrong, but for what it is worth, here we are.

Wednesday 13th February

This was when I ran down there to get a blood test and the watch kept running whilst I was at the surgery.

Map

Friday 15th February

Slightly shorter run, but again Wednesday’s distance includes spurious data from the watch not pausing properly.

Map

Saturday Afternoon Hike

We hike every year, as often as possible, and we always commence with a hike around Malham Cove in the Yorkshire Dales. It is beautiful up there.

Map

If you are not too experienced a hiker or you need to get fit then this is not too challenging and the location is rewarding in terms of scenery and views looking out over Yorkshire, and the fantastic waterfall, Janet’s Foss.

Ingleborough Conquered. The Revenge of the Stick People.

This ‘conquered’ post is a slight cheat as we have successfully ascended Ingleborough before, however this time we took a different route to the previous straight up and down climb that we did. Sadly I have no map to post today as I forgot to take along my GPS watch to record the route we took.

Revenge of the Stick People

Seriously, what is going on with people hiking with sticks? I hiked as a kid and never saw anyone using sticks, whereas now every bugger and his dog seems to have them. Has the human race mutated into stick people who can’t walk anywhere unaided? Did I miss the memo or something?

I take a very dim view of this kind of thing. Unless a disability is in play you do not need sticks to hike. Get a grip people.

Photographs

At the summit.

Summit panorama

Whernside in the distance

A beautiful day for hiking in the Yorkshire Dales.

Christ I’m sunburnt.

Week in Review

Summary

Last week I moved from 600 to 1000 metres in the pool, from 2 to 3 miles running and I completed a rigorous 8.4 miles family hike over Whernside in the Yorkshire Dales. This was a good week with which to start a long summer of outdoor activities.

Coming Next

This year I want to break out of the Dales and conquer more of the Lake District. The big targets are Skiddaw and Blencathra, each of which are approximately 900 metre climbs so they are ones to work up to. I take the kids hiking so it wouldn’t be a problem for adults to climb those two but the sprogs need to work up to climbs like that. Luckily there is the gorgeous Cat Bells fell, around a 500 metre elevation.

I can’t wait to ascend this fell over the weekend and get some photographs of the stunning Lake District views. In addition to that I want to push up to 4 miles running and 1500 metres swimming. That leaves me with one hike to plan for the weekend. Time to research…

Whernside Redux: Electric Boogaloo

I am slightly concerned about my Garmin Vivoactive sports watch. Granted it is not cutting edge technology any more, it’s an old model of sports watch, however either it or the Apple Health app is calculating things badly. My money is on Garmin doing it wrong which is unfortunate. Here is my reasoning:

Garmin stats

Apple Health Stats

According to the Yorkshire Dales website climbing Whernside is 8.4 miles of hiking. Given that Apple Health clocks all of my steps during the day it seems sensible to believe that I hiked the 8.4 miles and the rest is normal everyday wandering about.

Garmin Vivoactive clocked me at 6.41 miles which seems very low. I have no idea why it does this but I think it vastly underestimates the distance I hiked.

That being said, despite the notoriety of Whernside for bad weather today’s hike was great. I even took photos.

Ingleborough from the descent

Tadpole Hunting

Millie, our dog, Pulling a Pint

Here, finally, is the map

Whatever is going on with my tracking equipment I can attest to the joy found in ascending this peak. Even though I have done it many times before it is beautiful to see the view from the summit. We definitely earned our pint in the country pub at the end.

Summit Panorama

Whernside: Conquered!

Last weekend we conquered Whernside, the only one of the Yorkshire Three Peaks left for us to do. Our next challenge is to complete the three in a day, however that will not be for a while as it is asking a lot of three under-tens. I have also been locked out of my Garmin account so I can only provide a JPEG image of the map rather than my usual GPX file so I have some nice photographs too, including the beautiful Ribblehead viaduct which pretty much points at Whernside itself as one approaches it from the car parking area.

Enjoy the photographs if that’s your bag. We have pretty much covered the Yorkshire Dales and so we are now moving on to our summer plans to start Wainwright’s first  book of Lakeland Maps, The Eastern Fells.

Cautley Spout: Conquered!

After a weekend or so without hiking we got out today, and I think that the season is winding down now as we lost the light awfully quickly towards the end of the walk. We visited a waterfall walk in the Yorkshire Dales called Cautley Spout which is located in Sedbergh. It is beautiful to look at and challenging to hike. Fortunately, after we found ourselves on the wrong path for the descent we turned it into a straightforward up and down climb, however had we been on a circular that had taken us out of sight of where we started then the dark conditions would have left us in serious danger of getting lost in the night, a terrible position to be in. As it is you can tell from the GPS track exactly where we got lost and had to double back on ourselves to make it down. In the process of climbing we reached the summit of Calf Fell before descending more or less the way we came. A good day of hiking.

Map, Data and Photos

  • 5.59 miles
  • 3:37:29
  • 1769 feet climbed
  • 567 calories burned

Ingleborough: Conquered!

Yet another hiking triumph! This time we successfully ascended Ingleborough, one of the Yorkshire Three Peaks, and returned, all before teatime. This was one hell of an exertion, and at 6.25 miles hiked and 1736 feet climbed it was about as taxing as a hike can get for under-10s to do without at least one of them suffering a complete meltdown. iOS health kindly informed me that it was the equivalent if climbing 112 flights of stairs (where each flight is classed as climbing a floor).

This was every bit as challenging as I remember it when I completed the Three Peaks as a teenager, with Ingleborough being the final climb and therefore gut-wrenchingly difficult, and I will forever associate it with extreme fatigue and throbbing pain in my feet! Of course, that pain is really not pain at all, it’s the glow of achievement. I will stress, however, if you experience real pain during exercise then stop immediately and seek medical attention.

Map and Data

  • 6.24 miles
  • 3:6:9 hours
  • 29.49 minute miles
  • 1265 calories burned
  • 1736 feet climbed

Hawdraw Force: Conquered!

Today we went for a short, flat and relatively easy hike which covered what I believe is the largest overground waterfall in England, possibly the UK, Hawdraw Force. This was a beautiful sight, I must say, although I was disgusted to be asked to pay £10 just for the privilege of looking at it. That is one element of being British/English I loathe the most; we are mean. In my experience the UK is one of the meanest countries on Earth. Everywhere I go there I find some little pipsqueak in the way, sticking his hand out, wanting his cut. That being said, this was a good day and I enjoyed it. My only complaint about this route is that it is very stop-startish. There are no long stretches where the kids and hounds can run, however, it was worth it to see the waterfall.

Map, Data and Photos

  • 4.26 miles
  • 01:19:46 hours
  • 18.43 minute miles
  • 542 calories burned
  • 433 feet climbed

 

A robin that decided to join us during our picnic.

Pub rules.

Hawdraw Force.

Pen-y-Ghent: Conquered!

Today I, my family and my two little hounds conquered the imposing Pen-y-Ghent, a fell and hill climb in the Yorkshire Dales that I climbed several times as a wee nipper, including once as a part of completing the Three Peaks, which is a 26 mile hike consisting of climbs over steep Pen-y-Ghent, horribly unpredictable (in weather terms) Whernside and long, flat-topped Ingleborough.

Today was a hell of a climb that included some pretty tough rock climbing. We ascended the steep flank of Pen-y-Ghent, leaving for last the leisurely descent towards Hunt Pot, a huge pot hole in the Dales and, I believe, the largest of its kind in England. We covered 6.63 miles in total and made a 1578 foot total ascent. The highlight of the walk was the sight of a stunning double rainbow that touched down right on top of Hunt Pot.  It was absolutely breathtaking in the moment and a clear example of why outdoor pursuits are so rewarding. Also it was nice to meet some hiking Baby Boomers who fussed over our dirty dogs and who expressed their enthusiastic approval at us taking young children on such challenging excursions, at which point I noticed that we were the only family doing so. More’s the shame in my opinion, but hey, I am not here to judge the rest of the world. I just want to be the best father I can for my children and to give them a childhood of experiences that will make for great enjoyment at the time and great stories to tell their future friends, spouses and children of their own.

Map, Data and Photos (Including a panorama shot best viewed on as big a screen as possible)

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  • 6.63 miles
  • 03:04:34 hours
  • 27.49 minute miles
  • 1253 calories burned
  • 1578 feet climbed